georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Sgt. Flora Sandes was a British woman who found herself enlisted in the Serbian Army during World War I, having originally traveled there as an ambulance driver. She was highly decorated for her involvement in combat, but a wound in 1916 prevented further fighting. She was commissioned after the war, ending her military career as a Captain. Her experiences in the war earned her some mild celebrity, and her autobiography was well received.
(IWM)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

Sgt. Flora Sandes was a British woman who found herself enlisted in the Serbian Army during World War I, having originally traveled there as an ambulance driver. She was highly decorated for her involvement in combat, but a wound in 1916 prevented further fighting. She was commissioned after the war, ending her military career as a Captain. Her experiences in the war earned her some mild celebrity, and her autobiography was well received.

(IWM)

(via baedekersandbeasties)

290 Notes

eightiesart:

JIM BUCKELS

eightiesart:

JIM BUCKELS

(via violaviolet)

2132 Notes

10560 Notes

3810 Notes

feuille-d-automne:

14 juillet 1912 , bal populaire à Paris .

Via Gallica.bnf

(via 1901-a-space-odyssey)

173 Notes

retrowar:

WW2 safety hats

retrowar:

WW2 safety hats

10 Notes

lubnaipsum:

Beirut, 1958
"For variety, few cities can match Lebanon’s bustling capital. Part Christian, part Moslem, Beirut combines East and West, ancient and modern. Contrasts stand out vividly in street scenes such as this on the Rue Georges Picot. … A sign over the blouse shop shows the cedar, Lebanon’s national symbol. The market-bound shepherd in Near Eastern headdress and Western jacket icily ignores the latest European fashions."
- As seen on National Geographic

lubnaipsum:

Beirut, 1958

"For variety, few cities can match Lebanon’s bustling capital. Part Christian, part Moslem, Beirut combines East and West, ancient and modern. Contrasts stand out vividly in street scenes such as this on the Rue Georges Picot. … A sign over the blouse shop shows the cedar, Lebanon’s national symbol. The market-bound shepherd in Near Eastern headdress and Western jacket icily ignores the latest European fashions."

- As seen on National Geographic

(via adventuresinandyland)

125 Notes

mukasfilms:

[Images] The Double

11 Notes

buskingghosts:

“Battersea’s got lots of other resonances: it is a ruin, it’s been there for a long time, no one knows what to do with it, it’s monumental, it’s right in the centre of London, and there’s a long, long history of people attempting to do things with it, and not succeeding. It’s a kind of modern folly, and it’s a very powerful piece of imagery that’s unconsciously embedded in Londoners’ minds, cause we don’t think about it — it’s always there. I remember when I walked round it for the first time, many years ago, when I had a studio in the early 80s, someone even then was trying to get people together to buy the place — which was for sale for about five quid, on condition that something was done with it. But everyone realised that it was so enormous … we went down there as kind of a posse of people, thinking that maybe purchasing this place and doing something with it, and just realising how difficult that would be, because it’s just so enormous! And I lost interest in it. I mean I would have loved to have done it, but I realised that I couldn’t.
And so there’s a long history of that, and it’s almost like, in Londoners’ minds, it’s like the pyramids, or the sphinx, something like that. It’s a remnant of another age that has, oddly, an application to this age, and no one can figure out how to incorporate it into this city. And also it’s near the river, which is great, the location’s wonderful, so if you did project things onto it, a lot of people would see it, so it would make something magical at night, because it would be illuminated. Because of the nature of things I want to project on it, you could shift the shape of Battersea, of the building and the power station quite a lot, and then project things onto it. And that’s one of the great things about projection, that you can change the shape of things. So that would be part of the project, really, the projections would make it into different environments, so it could be a building, or a cliff face or a monumental statue or an overgrown ruin, or another Bauhaus-type building … you could show off some of the ghosts of the future, and I think it could be very exciting. And you could play music as well, we were thinking — there was a scheme of working with Resonance FM to have that broadcast at the same time; people could have headsets and go down the river on boats, and look at it with the soundtrack. So with all these ideas that we’re working on, they take a lot of time to fit together, we have to get several sets of sponsors and so on. But it’s taking shape, we will do something with it, I hope in about a year. I’d say it took a year longer than I thought to get the thing started, but we’ve got it started now, we’ve got the thing in motion, several people want to join in with it, we’re just looking to finalise.”
—John Foxx

buskingghosts:

“Battersea’s got lots of other resonances: it is a ruin, it’s been there for a long time, no one knows what to do with it, it’s monumental, it’s right in the centre of London, and there’s a long, long history of people attempting to do things with it, and not succeeding. It’s a kind of modern folly, and it’s a very powerful piece of imagery that’s unconsciously embedded in Londoners’ minds, cause we don’t think about it — it’s always there. I remember when I walked round it for the first time, many years ago, when I had a studio in the early 80s, someone even then was trying to get people together to buy the place — which was for sale for about five quid, on condition that something was done with it. But everyone realised that it was so enormous … we went down there as kind of a posse of people, thinking that maybe purchasing this place and doing something with it, and just realising how difficult that would be, because it’s just so enormous! And I lost interest in it. I mean I would have loved to have done it, but I realised that I couldn’t.

And so there’s a long history of that, and it’s almost like, in Londoners’ minds, it’s like the pyramids, or the sphinx, something like that. It’s a remnant of another age that has, oddly, an application to this age, and no one can figure out how to incorporate it into this city. And also it’s near the river, which is great, the location’s wonderful, so if you did project things onto it, a lot of people would see it, so it would make something magical at night, because it would be illuminated. Because of the nature of things I want to project on it, you could shift the shape of Battersea, of the building and the power station quite a lot, and then project things onto it. And that’s one of the great things about projection, that you can change the shape of things. So that would be part of the project, really, the projections would make it into different environments, so it could be a building, or a cliff face or a monumental statue or an overgrown ruin, or another Bauhaus-type building … you could show off some of the ghosts of the future, and I think it could be very exciting. And you could play music as well, we were thinking — there was a scheme of working with Resonance FM to have that broadcast at the same time; people could have headsets and go down the river on boats, and look at it with the soundtrack. So with all these ideas that we’re working on, they take a lot of time to fit together, we have to get several sets of sponsors and so on. But it’s taking shape, we will do something with it, I hope in about a year. I’d say it took a year longer than I thought to get the thing started, but we’ve got it started now, we’ve got the thing in motion, several people want to join in with it, we’re just looking to finalise.”

—John Foxx

(via bannteagann)

9 Notes

blastedheath:

Bill Hammond (New Zealand, b. 1947), Moa Hunter Cave 2, 2009. Acrylic on canvas, 90 x 60 cm.

blastedheath:

Bill Hammond (New Zealand, b. 1947), Moa Hunter Cave 2, 2009. Acrylic on canvas, 90 x 60 cm.

(via hideback)

278 Notes

viedomestique:

Brini Maxwell par Bradford Noble.

viedomestique:

Brini Maxwell par Bradford Noble.

1 Notes

adventures-of-the-blackgang:


The British Library has released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose.
These images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books and concern a startling mix of subjects.
There are maps, geological diagrams, beautiful illustrations, comical satire, illuminated and decorative letters, colourful illustrations, landscapes, wall-paintings and so much more… keep reading

Image taken from The Two Hemispheres: A Popular Account of the Countries and Peoples of the World … Illustrated, etc.; 1885

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

The British Library has released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose.

These images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books and concern a startling mix of subjects.

There are maps, geological diagrams, beautiful illustrations, comical satire, illuminated and decorative letters, colourful illustrations, landscapes, wall-paintings and so much more… keep reading

Image taken from The Two Hemispheres: A Popular Account of the Countries and Peoples of the World … Illustrated, etc.; 1885

(via tabbystardust)

33 Notes

(Source: vertigo1871, via tristanna)

632 Notes

54 Notes

464 Notes